Miscellaneous Whittle Documents


Will of Francis Whittle, wife Sarah (believed to be Coles) and 2 daughters, Serena and Mary.


Courtesy Calvin M. McClung Collection, Knox County Public Library, Knoxville, TN.

James Flanagan, Francis Whittle and Red Hill.


Courtesy History of the Construction of the Buildings at the University of Virginia, 1817-1828 by Frank Edgar Grizzard, Jr.

Will of James Whittle of Cumberland and Randolph County, NC. From Deed Books of Randolph Co., NC, with notes of William Perry Johnson, 1944, James owned 236 acres in Randolph County, acquired from Marmaduke in 1794.


Courtesy Calvin M. McClung Collection, Knox County Public Library, Knoxville, TN.

Letter from Charles E. Whittle, Jr to all Whittle kinfolk.


Courtesy of Charles E. Whittle, Jr., 3 Mar 1973, Danville, KY

Benjamin Poe's pension application at age 86 and record of Revolutionary War Service with John Garner and James Whittle.


Courtesy of the National Archives and www.footnote.com

Richard Duncan testifying to Samuel Deen's Revolutionary War Service following the death of his widow, Milky Duncan Deen. Daniel Holland does not state the purpose of this affidavit.


Courtesy of the National Archives and www.footnote.com

James Eidson, Sr. still has to justify his $20.00 per year pension as late as 1844 when he is over 80 years old. Although Burris Whittle was in the same company of militia, I doubt he saw as much action as James Eidson.

"...and keeping the Tories in check in the...Barnwell and Orangeburg, that at this time he volunteered for six months and served out his time, that he afterwards volunteered under Capt Sterling Turner and marched to Augusta, that he was at the taking of Browns Fort in June 1781, that under said officer he served six months, that after his return home, he again volunteered under Capt Mike Watson, for six months, that during this period that he was at the Battle of Eutaw Springs, that he was at the engagement at Dean Swamp, when Capt Watson was killed, that the company was then taken command by Capt William Butler, that he was in company when Cunningham and his party, in November 1781, all died and massacred Capt Turner and his company, and that he afterwards volunteered under Capt William Butler for six months and served the tour in active service and continued afterwards under his command so long as it was a company to keep up a military force. The defendant further states and ... that from the year 1777 to the close of the war, that he was nearly the whole of his time engaged in active service in defense of his Country, either in camp or engaged or employed in scouting through the country, keeping the Tories in check, the defendant further sates that was twice taken prisoner by the Tories and made his escape from them and joined his own company again. That he had written discharges from a part of his officers that some years since he had his house burnt and all his papers. That he was born in the State of Virginia, that his parents came over to this state when he was five years old, and has resided here ever since."


Courtesy of the National Archives and www.footnote.com

Home Next Last

Name Index